Bees, nature and our world

It got cold here this weekend. Too cold to go do the apple picking we had planned. So instead we did some shopping, the wee one and I picking out a bday gift for the hubby, and we all picked up craft supplies to make cards.

At home we made our dinner from scratch. We made the Gluten Free pizza crusts, then baked them as we prepped all the toppings. The wee one had fun shaping the dough. They were delicious. I highly recommend Make Ahead Paleo, we haven’t had a bad recipe out of it yet.

After dinner we relaxed on the couch. We let the wee one pick what we watched and it was a Disney Nature Documentary. So we learned all about flowers, bees, butterflies and bats. We always have the discussion about how important bees are. We talked about the plants we had planted over the summer and how they helped the bees and discussed how maybe some day we’d have a bigger yard to plant even more flowers.

The hubby wants to bee keep when we have a yard. If we have the space and take some classes on it then I am all in. Helping the environment is important.

As we walk the sacred path we do need to think about what we can do to help the world. It might be something as simple as planting flowers, herbs and veggies in your garden to help the pollenators of the world. Remember to check out what is native in your area for plants. That will help.

We try to buy local and in season, and I work hard at recycling and trying to make things last as long as possible. I know there are things I get that are not helpful, but I try to offset my carbon footprint where I can.

May we tread as lightly as possible upon the Mother Earth. Don’t forget without Her gifts, without Her helpers in the world, we have no life. Bless the bees, the butterflies, the hummingbirds… and all the other pollenators who help us survive.

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One thought on “Bees, nature and our world

  1. Melissa says:

    You may be able to have mason bees with very little yard space, and they don’t require a lot of work or any real training. They don’t make honey, but they are pollinators.

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